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Republican Wolfe: Brian Sims Represents the Absolute Worst in Politics

Republican Wolfe: Brian Sims Represents the Absolute Worst in Politics

Philadelphia, PA – Matt Wolfe, Republican candidate for City Council at Large, addressed the recent videos of state representative Brian Sims harassing Pro-Life supporters outside of Planned Parenthood in Center City.

“As I watched the videos Sims posted, I was amazed that an elected official was acting in such a hateful and mean-spirited manner. My amazement quickly turned to anger, as I watched representative Sims follow this woman outside of Planned Parenthood for nearly 9 minutes, hurling insults attempting to intimidate her. In the next video I watched, Sims offered a $100 bounty if anyone could identify a few teenage girls praying outside of Planned Parenthood. Brian Sims represents the absolute worst in politics.” Stated Matt Wolfe, Republican City Council At Large candidate. Read More

Republican Wolfe: Krasner a Disgrace for Withdrawing Mumia Opposition, Cares More About Politics Than Victims and Justice

Republican Wolfe: Krasner a Disgrace for Withdrawing Mumia Opposition, Cares More About Politics Than Victims and Justice

Republican Candidate for City Council at Large Matt Wolfe Condemns DA Larry Krasner for Withdrawing Opposition to Mumia Abu-Jamal’s Review of his Case in the Supreme Court

Philadelphia, PA – Matt Wolfe, Republican candidate for City Council at Large, condemned DA Larry Krasner’s decision to withdraw his opposition to Mumia Abu-Jamal’s attempt argue for a new trial before the Pennsylvania Supreme Court.  “Mumia Abu-Jamal savagely murdered Philadelphia police officer Danny Faulkner in 1981.  The evidence is clear and the trial has been reviewed time and time again in the almost 40 years since the murder.  No court has ever given any credence to the arguments that he was innocent or did not have a fair trial.  Larry Krasner owes Danny Faulkner and his family better treatment.” Read More

Matt Wolfe Slams Council for Meek Mill Weekend on St. Patrick’s Day

Matt Wolfe Slams Council for Meek Mill Weekend on St. Patrick’s Day

Philadelphia, PA – Matt Wolfe, Republican Candidate for City Council At Large, denounces City Council’s decision to declare March 15-17 as “Meek Mill Weekend.”

“This is a disgrace on so many levels,” stated Wolfe. “This is a slap in the face to Philadelphia’s Irish community. I am proud of my Irish heritage, and St. Patrick’s Day is our day.” Wolfe has been a long-time member of the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick and an AOH chapter which is no longer active. “Council either did not care about the conflict, or did not even realize there was a conflict. Either way, it shows that City Hall gives no consideration to the Irish community when making decisions.”

The resolution creating this “holiday” weekend was sponsored by 14 of the 17 Council members and stated, in part “Robert Williams, known to the world as Meek Mill, is a critically-acclaimed multiplatinum hiphop artist, songwriter, entrepreneur, actor and criminal justice reform advocate that hails from North Philadelphia.”

“Even putting aside the conflict with St. Patrick’s Day, should City Council be spending their time honoring a convicted felon? Philadelphia has real problems – high taxes, unemployment, crime, drugs etc. – and the fact that they spend their time honoring a rapper is ridiculous. But it is obvious that this is an attempt by incumbents on Council – each of whom will have an opponent in the upcoming elections – to appear ‘hip’ to what they perceive as a younger voter base. Simply put, City Hall is using their positions to increase their chances of reelection – which is a betrayal of the public trust – but has also made Philly a national embarrassment, again, in doing so.”

Meek Mill has been arrested for illegal firearm and drug possession, assault and parole violations.

“And if City Hall is going to honor somebody, why select an individual who has repeatedly committed crimes over the past decade? He is not Nelson Mandela.  Just two years ago he assaulted two people in an airport. Regardless of how you feel about how he was treated by the criminal justice system, we can all agree that there are more deserving people from Philadelphia who we can promote as a role model to our youth. Guion Bluford – the first African American in space and Philly native – is someone who is much more accomplished and could serve as a role model for our youth. Sadly, City Council cares more about reelection than setting a positive example for our children.” Wolfe concluded.

About Matt Wolfe: Matt Wolfe is a former Deputy Attorney General.  He also served in the administration of Governor Tom Ridge as the Chief Counsel of the Department of Labor and Industry, which played a key role in helping Pennsylvania’s economy grow and attract new jobs.  Before that he was Assistant Counsel at the Department of Transportation and he was appointed a Special Assistant District Attorney and Special Prosecutor in several counties.  In Philadelphia, former District Attorney Ron Castille appointed him a Special Assistant District Attorney to represent the city to close down nuisance bars in his neighborhood.  He helped close down the notorious Times Café and the Purple Fox.  He also served with Sam Katz when Sam was on the School Board as a member of the Philadelphia School Board’s Task Force on Scholastics and Sports, which developed academic standards for public school students to meet in order to be eligible for sports and extracurricular activities.

Matt Wolfe has been a community activist in West Philadelphia since he was in college.  He was a long-time member of the Board of Directors of the Spruce Hill Community Association, also serving as its Vice President.  Matt has served as a member of the 18th Police District Neighborhood Advisory Committee and was Vice Chairman of the Woodland District of the Boy Scouts of America.  He is active in his parish, St. Francis DeSales, and has served on the Parish Pastoral Council and as a Eucharistic Minister.

Matt Wolfe has been an active Republican since college, is the Chairman of the University City Republican Committee and has served his community for years as a ward leader and committeeman.  Wolfe is a lawyer, having graduated from the University of Pennsylvania and Villanova Law School, practicing election law and has taught other lawyers in continuing education classes in the area.  He currently maintains his own law office, understanding the challenges that a small business owners face.  His law office is in West Philadelphia where he lives with his wife, Denise Furey.  He has two adult sons, Jay and Ross.

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Matt Wolfe Top Challenger in Straw Poll Among Council At Large Candidates

Matt Wolfe Top Challenger in Straw Poll Among Council At Large Candidates

Matt Wolfe, Republican Candidate for City Council At Large, finished ahead of all non-incumbent challengers in a straw poll Tuesday night, coming in 2nd place overall out of 8 declared candidates. The straw poll was held Tuesday February 19th at the South Philadelphia Republican Coalition’s candidates night, which 200-300 people attended. Wolfe finished first among non-incumbents, and second overall.

“I want to thank the South Philadelphia Republican Coalition for hosting such a great event, and all the Republicans from throughout the city who attended. This was a great night and I am honored to have received such strong support in the straw poll. I am the true Republican voice in this race, and last night’s results showed that voters are excited by my promise to offer a true Republican voice in City Hall that will challenge years of Democrat corruption and failed policies.” Stated Wolfe. Read More

Matt Wolfe Top Challenger in Straw Poll Among Council At Large Candidates

Matt Wolfe, Republican Candidate for City Council At Large, finished ahead of all non-incumbent challengers in a straw poll Tuesday night, coming in 2nd place overall out of 8 declared candidates. The straw poll was held Tuesday February 19th at the South Philadelphia Republican Coalition’s candidates night, which 200-300 people attended. Wolfe finished first among non-incumbents, and second overall.

“I want to thank the South Philadelphia Republican Coalition for hosting such a great event, and all the Republicans from throughout the city who attended. This was a great night and I am honored to have received such strong support in the straw poll. I am the true Republican voice in this race, and last night’s results showed that voters are excited by my promise to offer a true Republican voice in City Hall that will challenge years of Democrat corruption and failed policies.” Stated Wolfe. Read More

Republican Wolfe Announces Support for U.S. Attorney’s Lawsuit to Stop Safe Injection Sites in Philadelphia

Republican Wolfe Announces Support for U.S. Attorney’s Lawsuit to Stop Safe Injection Sites in Philadelphia

Republican Candidate for City Council at Large Matt Wolfe Announces Support for U.S. Attorney’s Lawsuit to Stop Safe Injection Sites in Philadelphia

 

Philadelphia, PA – Republican candidate for City Council at Large Matt Wolfe announced his strong support of the U.S. Attorney’s recently filed civil lawsuit to stop Safehouse and others from setting up “safe” injection sites in Philadelphia.  “This activity is clearly illegal under federal law.  It is very troubling that City Hall has, yet again, decided to ignore the law to further its own political agenda.”

 

If City Halls permits the opening safe injection sites, Philadelphia would be the only place in the United States that allows such a program. “Just like the soda tax, City Hall wants to be ‘first’ to enact the most extreme progressive policies no matter how destructive they may be. Even California’s governor vetoed a bill a few months ago permitting safe injection sites in his state because of the harm they will undoubtably cause.”

Read More

Press Release: Wolfe Reacts to Local 98 Indictments

Press Release: Wolfe Reacts to Local 98 Indictments

For Immediate Release
Date: February 1, 2019
Contact Information:
Ross Wolfe
Rosswolfe@comcast.net
(610) 745-1626

Republican Candidate for City Council at Large Matt Wolfe Calls for Councilman Henon to be Removed as City Council Majority Leader – Asks City to Come Clean

Philadelphia, PA– The U.S. Attorney’s Office announced the indictments of City Councilman Bobby Henon, union leader Johnny Doc and several other members of Local 98.  Republican City Council candidate Matt Wolfe spoke out about the indictments.

“These indictments expose the corrupt side of Philadelphia politics.” Wolfe said.  “Everyone is innocent until proven guilty in the criminal courts.  That being said, Councilman Henon’s ability to function on city council with the allegations against him has been compromised.”

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Matt Wolfe Endorsed By Philadelphia Daily News

Matt Wolfe Endorsed By Philadelphia Daily News

Click here to read the Philadelphia Daily News’ entire endorsement of Matt Wolfe.

REPUBLICAN at-large Council members could be pitied for holding some of the loneliest jobs in City Hall. That said, the two slots for Republicans on Council can be important, not just to carve out issues that might otherwise be ignored, but as loyal opposition to follow-the-leader members of the majority party.

The current incumbents, David Oh and Dennis O’Brien, alas haven’t provided that role when it was most needed: calling for public hearings on the proposed PGW sale to UIL. They fell in with their colleagues in letting the deal die without explanation or full airing of the issues. For that reason, we recommend the five picks for the two at-large seats go to the challengers, all of whom represent fine choices. They include Matt Wolfe, an attorney who ran for a Council seat last year; former mayoral contender and Northeast Chamber of Commerce head Al TaubenbergerTerry Tracy, a retail executive who has run for city controller; James Williams, track coach at Cheyney University; Dan Tinney, 66th Ward treasurer, who has worked in finance.

Matt Wolfe Questions Republican Councilman O’Brien’s Contribution from Democrat Council President Darrell Clarke

Matt Wolfe Questions Republican Councilman O’Brien’s Contribution from Democrat Council President Darrell Clarke

This article was published by Philly.Com on May 13, 2015. Click here to read the article on the publisher’s website.

Remember that time that Council President Darrell L. Clarke was teasing everyone about running for mayor and holding fundraisers all over town and in New York?

Well, Clarke’s PAC accrued a half-million dollar war chest this past winter. But the Council President then decided he would not run for mayor.

Clarke recently flung the money chest open. He is helping out his Council colleagues who face a tough fight at the polls next week, as well as one Council newcomer running unopposed.

(Clarke is running unopposed in the Fifth District Council Democratic primary.)

Clarke’s campaign finance reports filed Friday show that Friends of Darrell Clarke gave $10,000 each to at-large Democratic incumbents Bill Greenlee, Blondell Reynolds Brown, Wilson Goode Jr. and Ed Neilson. He also gave $5,000 to Republican incumbent Dennis O’Brien.

The at-large candidates are the most vulnerable in next week’s election.

Friends of Darrell Clarke also gave $10,000 to state Rep. Cherelle Parker who is running unopposed to replace Ninth District Councilwoman Marian B. Tasco, who is retiring.

Second District Councilman Kenyatta Johnson, who is being challenged by developer Ori Feibush, received $5,000 from Clarke.

Through a spokesman, Clarke said: “I am fortunate enough to be able to help out my colleagues who deserve re-election. Simple as that.”

The big checks from the sitting Council President are common practice. Former Council President Anna Verna was also known to give out big checks.

“It’s very smart of him to do that,” said former Councilman Bill Green.

The council members who are beneficiaries of Clarke’s generosity would be more likely to vote for him for president, Green said.

Councilwoman Maria Quinones Sanchez, who did not receive a donation from Clarke, said the checks are also a “thank you” gesture for the last four years.

“He’s being supportive,” Sanchez said. “It’s not unusual.”

O’Brien, however, received some heat Tuesday for taking Clarke’s money.

Republican at-large Council candidate Matt Wolfe said Clarke’s $5,000 “preserve(s) O’Brien as a reliable vote for his agenda.”

“Councilman O’Brien has stood shoulder to shoulder with Darrell Clarke and the Democrats on City Council, voting for the cigarette tax, voting to make the “temporary” sales tax permanent, voting for a bill that forces employers in Philadelphia to give paid leave to employees that is not in effect anywhere else in the state and killing the deal to sell PGW,” Wolfe said.

Clarke raised an additional $103,850 from January through May 4. Within that period, he spent $256,250, including the checks he gave to his colleagues. That left him with $350,000 to spend as of Friday.

A New Face for Philadelphia Republicans

A New Face for Philadelphia Republicans

This article was published by the Philadelphia Inquirer on April 22, 2014. Click here to read the article on the publisher’s website.

By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer

POSTED: April 22, 2014Matthew Wolfe was part of an insurgency that spent three years trying to overthrow the leadership of Philadelphia’s feckless Republican Party in the hopes of building a viable alternative to Democratic dominance.

Last year, the GOP ended the fight by naming State Rep. John Taylor, a respected legislator, chairman. The party also hired a young, aggressive operative as executive director.

“We have a stronger Republican Party than we did a year ago,” Wolfe said, before adding: “We have a long way to go.”

Just how far the party has traveled toward relevance will be tested May 20, when Wolfe, a lawyer in University City, runs for City Council in a special election. An at-large vacancy was created when Bill Green left Council to chair the School Reform Commission.

Wolfe’s opponent, State Rep. Ed Neilson, could not be more representative of the need to finally crack the Democratic stranglehold on power, Wolfe said.

After statewide redistricting, Neilson would have been forced to square off against fellow Democratic State Rep. John Sabatina Jr. Instead, the city’s Democratic ward leaders hand-picked Neilson for the Council race to avoid a nasty primary. (Wolfe, a GOP ward leader, was picked by his party leaders, as well, per the special-election rules.)

“What was the analysis in selecting my opponent? Was it, ‘What’s best for Philadelphia?’ ” Wolfe said. “No, it was, ‘What’s the most expensive race we’re going to face? How can we preserve our resources to sustain ourselves?’ ”

Born in Pittsburgh and raised in Elkins Park (his parents hailed from West Virginia; his father worked for television maker Philco), Wolfe, 58, is a peculiar species of urban Republican.

He has lived in West Philadelphia since his undergraduate days at the University of Pennsylvania, where he first got involved in Republican politics, and he espouses a love of city living and public transportation that probably would roll the eyes of many state Republicans.

He stands on solid GOP ground when he talks about reforming the city’s public employee pension system and work rules, but those are also positions to which Mayor Nutter, a Democrat, has been holding fast for most of his two terms.

Wolfe hews close to party orthodoxy on taxes (raising them is “one of the worst things you can do”) and school choice (he supports expanding charter schools.)

But he refuses to situate himself on the political spectrum.

“This is a city election. We have to fix potholes,” he said. “I’m out there talking about city priorities.”

He and the party hope to attract independent and Republican voters in May, in part by pushing opposition to a ballot question.

That question will ask city voters whether they want to end the requirement that elected Philadelphia officials must resign if they want to run for another office.

Wolfe likens ending the rule to paying politicians to look for new jobs – a “Not on our Dime” Twitter handle and Facebook page were started last week by the new GOP executive director, Joseph J. DeFelice.

But in a city where registered Republicans are outnumbered 61/2-1, trying to motivate the base with the resign-to-run issue could create another schism in the party. The drive to end the rule was led by at-large Councilman David Oh, one of three Republicans now holding elective citywide offices.

“That does kind of make things a little awkward,” Oh said last week after his own party voted to oppose his ballot measure. “But, look, people don’t have to agree with me.”

Oh said the rule encourages a political stagnation that plays into the city’s one-party rule – Democrats typically can hold office as long as they like, so they rarely risk leaving safe jobs without party approval and backing.

(Nutter was an exception, resigning from Council to pursue an underdog campaign for mayor in 2007.)

DeFelice said Republicans must reach into new areas of the city, be open and transparent, and generate some buzz.

He launched the party’s first social-media sites, and he has been using them to poke fun at Democrats, such as the state House members alleged to have taken cash from an undercover informant in an ill-starred sting investigation. He recently built a March Madness-like bracket with the “Underhanded Eight” worst ethics violators.

“It could have been a little juvenile,” he said, “but it got us good play.”

DeFelice said the party was likely to run fewer but better-qualified candidates in coming years.

“We need to start appealing to voters and letting them know the Democratic Party isn’t necessarily the best for the middle class,” he said.

Wolfe agreed, calling the Democratic Party an “oligarchy.”

“They don’t care about you,” he said. “They care about getting reelected, pandering to special interests, and amassing political power.”

Democrats have ruled more or less without opposition since Mayor Joseph S. Clark Jr. was elected in 1951. The last Republican to defeat a Democrat in a citywide race was Ronald D. Castille running for district attorney in 1989.

“This is going to take time,” DeFelice said. “I’m not naive.”

Despite the long odds, Wolfe said he was “in this to win . . . I’m not just going through the motions.”

“I’m hopeful that if I don’t win it, then some positive will come out of it,” he said. “That maybe people will look at some issues in a different way.”